SOLOS (Amazon Originals, 2021)

What is SOLOS about?

SOLOS is about 8 people, from different times but the same universe. Eight people who drift together or apart, who are tied up together in the fabric of space.  Each episode stars one person, only the finale features two. Each protagonist has someone to play off of, either themselves in a double role, or sometimes, an AI companion, a disembodied voice. Each performance is stellar, and each script is tangled up in speculative fiction tropes. Time travel, humans and bots, space and the advancements of technology. The good ones, and the bad ones.

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Rebecca (Netflix, 2020)


First published on Patreon early access.

It’s been a while since I last read Rebecca, and it’s been even longer since I last watched the Hitchcock adaptation. So I went into this movie still knowing the plot, but having quite forgotten some of the more unsettling details. Or, rather, some of the small, seemingly inconsequential bits and pieces that, seeing it brought to the screen once again, really make this story sing.

Mrs de Winter steps from a fairy tale right into a ghost story, but if you were expecting actual ghosts, you will be disappointed this time. The horror aspect of this story — and the way it’s adapted here, visually — is firmly rooted in playing with Mrs de Winter’s naiveté, her anxieties and innocence. Danvers (a marvellous turn in the role by Kristin Scott Thomas) is a master at gaslighting; and Rebecca shows that there is no lie too small or too blatant to make someone doubt their own mind. Or, more importantly, to make everyone else doubt her.

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The Old Guard: Review & A Look at the Intertextual

First published on Patreon early access as The Old Guard: A Close Comparison Reading of Netflix’ Adaptation of the Graphic Novel.

What Makes The Old Guard A Unique Action Movie

The Old Guard as a movie a standout feat — in terms of craft, narrative as well as production. The majority of production staff were women, with an above average number being Black or women of colour. Led by a Black female director, Gina Prince-Bythewood, and boasting a stellar cast, The Old Guard is entertaining, an exceptionally well-made action movie, and an extraordinary comic book adaptation, to boot. It helps that the original graphic novel (script by Greg Rucka) is unique and exceptionally well told.

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Black Spot | Zone Blanche & Twin Peaks: A (Purely Speculative) Play on Intertextuality

How the French crime/horror drama series gleefully subverts key moments & concepts from the 90s cult show as it flirts with the genre and parallels.

Warning: contains major spoilers for Season 1, minor spoilers for Season 2, of Black Spot; as well as for Twin Peaks.


1. The new district attorney, Siriani arriving in town — tall trees, fog, grey skies. For a moment, it could be déjà vu. It’s could be Agent Cooper’s arrival in Twin Peaks. But where Coop’s first appearance and entrance into that small Washington town, extended and filmed from the passenger seat, was by far the most peaceful of his experience, the DA’s car stops without warning before we ever meet him. He has to get out. He has no reception, but there is a telephone pole just down the road, vandalised. A thing fallen out of time, just like so much in Twin Peaks — like so much in Villefranche; like the town entry sign that is as quaint as can be.

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Doctor Who: Knock Knock + Oxygen (S10E04+05)

Doctor Who Series 10 is shaping up to be a true mystery series — rather than the only challenge being to outsmart an obvious villain, a lot of work is being done by Bill and the Doctor to figure out what they’re even fighting and/or running away from. In these two episodes from early May, that set of challenges comes in the shape of a haunted house and murderous capitalist spacesuits, respectively. Continue reading →