The Twelfth Doctor has returned to Gallifrey.

Doctor Who: Heaven Sent + Hell Bent

Written by Steven Moffat

Is that the…? Yes, it is. The Doctor’s back in the Utah diner where he met with Rory, Amy, and River in The Impossible Astronaut — except this isn’t quite Utah, because Clara did something clever and they’re actually in Nevada. Oh, who cares. Continue reading →

Clara faces the Raven

Doctor Who: Sleep No More + Face the Raven

Previously on Doctor Who: The Zygon Invasion + The Zygon Inversion

The filler before the series finale, Sleep No More is truly a standalone, whilst Face the Raven connects to the series finale, Heaven Sent/Hell Bent. Since I don’t fancy writing a three-episode review next week, I’m keeping with the two-episode scheme today.

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Peter Capaldi and Maisie Williams in Doctor Who Series 9

Throwback Thursday — Doctor Who: The Girl Who Died + The Woman Who Lived

Previously on Doctor Who: Before the Flood.

In the first two-parter guest starring Maisie Williams, we’re visiting first the Vikings, and then the (I’m guessing) late 18th century. With war-thirsty aliens projecting a false god Odin into the skies (very Monty Python’s Holy Grail, by the way), the mere fact that we’re visiting the Vikings is not so much the point, except perhaps for the idea of a death in battle being a good way to go. Since the whole episode is set within one tiny village and, intermittently, on one pretty small spaceship, the world-building isn’t as extensive as we’ve known it to be. Continue reading →

Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman in the Series 9 episode 'Under the Lake'

Throwback Thursday — Doctor Who: Under the Lake + Before the Flood

Previously on Doctor Who: The Witch’s Familiar.

In this two-parter opened by Toby Whithouse, we see a bit of a reset — this is, in essence, the first proper adventure after everything that’s happened. After Clara said goodbye for the first time, after Danny’s first death and then his second. Being abducted to Skaro doesn’t really count because, well, it wasn’t the Doctor that called, it was UNIT. So this is the first we see of Clara and the Doctor on the road again, wherever they went at the end of Last Christmas notwithstanding. Continue reading →

Jenna Coleman, Peter Capaldi, and Nick Frost star in Last Christmas (2014)

Throwback Thursday—Doctor Who: Last Christmas (2014)

Previously on Doctor Who: Death in Heaven.

Life — you know, that thing that happens when the Doctor’s not there to fix it. I had my own bit of Life in 2015, and it wasn’t going so well. Hence, I scaled back my usual blogging activity and treaded the Whoniverse more or less incognito. But now, it’s 2016, it’s a fresh start, and I do still love this idiot travelling in a box. So I’ll use the good old tradition of Throwback Thursdays to blog about Series 9, Clara’s exit, and Peter Capaldi’s second year as the Doctor.

In this case, I know I am horribly late to the party, but do indulge me — we’re travelling back to 2014, and Peter and Jenna’s first Christmas Special together. Last Christmas. Speaking as a plot detective, one might also call it The Curious Case of Suspending Disbelief for Strange Men Distributing Gifts. Continue reading →

Sherlock: The Abominable Bride.

Previously on Sherlock: His Last Vow.

There are no ghosts in this world. Save for the ones we make for ourselves.

This is the story of five minutes in the life of Sherlock Holmes. Five minutes in the real world, but a lifetime in another — in Sherlock’s Mind Palace, to be precise. In the time it takes for the plane to turn around and come back down to land in His Last Vow, as John speaks the foreboding words, “There’s an East Wind coming,” Sherlock has already gone deep into himself, into the recesses of his mind, to solve a mystery that has kept us on the edges of our seats for two years.

How is he alive?

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Charlize Theron as Imperator Furiosa in Mad Max: Fury Road

Mad Max: Fury Road

If you haven’t seen Mad Max: Fury Road yet, I strongly urge you to.

Not only does it tell us, in the wake of summer action blockbusters like Age of Ultron and Fast and Furious 7, that this genre is neither dead nor dying — it tells us that it works across gender boundaries.

Tom Hardy’s Mad Max introduces us to a not forgotten hero, but one left in the dust of time, at least when it comes to the silver screen. It introduces us to the hero of a franchise, the male hero — and we get to know him through the role he plays not in his own story, not in some heroic journey that he’s mapped out for himself. We get to know him through the action he takes not for himself, but for others, through his role in someone else’s story.

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